The Snack Thief by Andrea Camilleri

Laying_Out_the_Pasta_at_our_Albergo_in_Tripoli_Art.IWMARTLD2924Food and detectives go together like bread and cheese. The number of fictional gourmet detectives is legion. If you intend to write a mystery novel, adding a foodie here or there as well as a cat or dog is always helpful. Here’s a detective who happens to be Sicilian. He knows his food.

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 12.02.22 PMRead more here at google books

Some Anti-Foodwriting Notes

Interesting article for writers from Ploughshares on the act of food being dropped/inserted/stirred/shaken/baked into writing.

Speaking of which: The rest 4waitress? The one with the grease stain and the nametag? She’s been trapped in short fiction since 1942, serving that same horrible pot of coffee. Occasionally she gets to flirt. But she never gets to be a real character. I think it’s time we released her. Let her go serve happily at Waffle Hut and change into a clean dress already.

Read the rest of this article at Ploughshares blog.

Black Beans by Laurie Colwin

256px-Annibale_Carracci_The_BeaneaterLaurie Colwin is the writer-turned-foodwriter in recent contemporary American foodwriting most likely to win “Most Unabashedly Well-Loved” by her audience. She writes of what home is and what families are supposed to be – and of the nurturing potential of food. Nothing complex, no layers or arguments. Just a clear-eyed gaze and a hug.

Screen Shot 2014-09-14 at 10.37.00 AMTo continue reading this piece in full (and to see the recipes provided and more) go to google books where Laurie Colwin writes of black beans.

Food Porn by Molly O’Neill

304px-Baker_BananaOriginator of the term ‘food porn’, Molly O’Neill describes the world of food as it stands today. This article was written in 2003 in the Columbia Journalism Review, but it clearly is as thorough and as true as it was on the day it was written.

On a balmy May evening in 1997, I was at a bookstore in Santa Barbara, California, signing copies of my third cookbook. It wasn’t my best book, and nearly every chapter of it had previously appeared in my food column in The New York Times Magazine. Nevertheless, nearly two hundred people waited to pay me homage — as well as $26.95 for the book.

The magazine was one of the most powerful platforms for food writing in the nation and, to the people in line, I was a rock star. My mother, a sensible Ohioan, was with me that night and she was appalled. She stood near as fans gushed admiration for my prose and recipes.

Finally, as if unable to contain herself another second, my mother interrupted one woman’s compliments and asked: “Do you actually cook that stuff?”

“Of course not,” replied the customer, who looked like my mother, tall, lean, with a white cap of stylishly coiffed hair. “Every week I cut them out of the magazine and promise myself I will cook them. Don’t we all?”

 

Continue reading this story at alternet

Picnics from Summer Cooking by Elizabeth David

Eugen_Klimsch_Das_Picknick_1894On picnic addicts and warm-weather food . . . with Elizabeth David, there’s always a story and the recipes . . . . well, you’ll have to know how to cook because her recipes are narratives and she has no intention of coddling anyone!

Screen Shot 2014-09-03 at 9.58.19 AMTo read more, go to google books, Elizabeth David’s “Summer Cooking”, here.

The Best Divisions for Knowledge of the Regions by Al-Muqadassi

585px-Auguste_Rodin_-_Les_Amours_Conduisant_le_Monde

The bluntness of the author is not unusual for the times he lived in, but it can still be startling to read.

About this book: “Written 1000 years ago, this geographical treatise was based on some 20 years of experiences undergone and observations noted in the author’s survey of the realm of Islam, from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. He presents his observations on its topography, vegetation, religion and culture.” (google books)

Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 9.15.22 AMTo read more, go to archive.org